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100% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 24 October 1837, part 4…Emanuel C. Reigart “resumed”: The gentleman from Allegheny had referred to the Constitution of ’76 as giving greater privileges to those who scruple to bear arms than the present Constitution. The sixth section of the first chapter of the Declaration of the Rights to which he refers, provides that “every member o…
100% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 24 October 1837, part 3…count of his religious sentiments. If he should fail to show that this conscientious scruple to bear arms was a religious sentiment in those who belonged to the Society of Friends, then his argument based on this declaration in the Constitution of 1776 could amount to nothing. But if he should succeed in showing that it was a religious sentiment, a part of the creed of this class of our citizens, then we must renounce all these principles which our fathers had laid…
100% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 24 October 1837, part 3…if any such there are, whether it was not our duty to grant this claim to all who sincerely asked it. It is as plain as day that there is a principle in this thing — it has been acknowledged in the Constitution itself, and in the Constitution of 1776. This principle was then acknowledged when our soil was stained with hostile blood; when the country was agitated by fear and all were ready to acknowledge that there was a Supreme Being to be looked up to. The princ…
100% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 24 October 1837, part 3…was then acknowledged when our soil was stained with hostile blood; when the country was agitated by fear and all were ready to acknowledge that there was a Supreme Being to be looked up to. The principle was acknowledged in the Constitution of 1776 as follows: “No part of a man’s property can be justly taken from him, or applied to public uses, without his own consent, or that of his legal representatives, nor can any man who is conscientiously scrupulous of be…
100% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 24 October 1837, part 2…ithin its bosom who may desire to rend and overthrow it. Now, sir, I have shown from Proud’s History what the opinions of the Society of Friends are in respect to public contributions; and I find, in the Constitution of 1776, the principle adopted and recognized under which they seem always to have acted. The 8th section of that Constitution is in these words: “Every member of society has a right to be protecte…
100% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 24 October 1837, part 2…n of a clause to some extent prohibiting the enactment of laws interfering with the religious scruples they entertained, and this was nothing more than was already secured to their fellows. This was asserted as a principle in the Constitution of 1776, and repeated in the existing Bill of Rights. It was, perhaps, sufficient merely to call attention to the fact that from the first settlement of Pennsylvania down to the present moment, it had been observed as a rule…
100% match30 July 2013…would be used in part for the military budget, Friends were expected in conscience to pay. The Revolution shifted the locus of tax-raising authority for Americans from London to state and federal governments. Whereupon Timothy Davis in 1776 circulated his tract titled, “Advice of a Quaker to Pay Tax to American Revolution.” War taxes, especially mixed ones, should be paid, wrote Davis, and he quoted a weighty Friend, Thomas Story, who had declared, “If…
100% match29 July 2013…, the Assembly imposed a tax of two pounds and ten shiilings on non-Associators, which would be remitted for those who joined a military unit. Under new pressure from the Associators they raised the tax to three pounds and ten shillings in April 1776. The Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention incorporated the principle of taxing conscientious objectors as an equivalent to military service in the Declaration of Rights they adopted. It made expli…
100% match27 August 2011…nted to treat with them and report to next meeting. John Decow had already been in trouble for “bearing of arms in a military manner” and had submitted a written condemnation of his actions to the meeting in 1776. This time a “testification” was produced against him and Joseph English, Jr., and they were informed of their appeal rights. Neither chose to appeal, and that’s the last w…
100% match26 May 2008…We can all be conscientious objectors. War tax resistance is conscientious objection. When 70 percent of the population is against the war in Iraq and they are made to pay for it, we have taxation without representation. It seems that it is way past the time to throw the tea into the harbor. Throwing tea into the harbor is as American as apple pie. We need a nonviolent revolution as much as the founders needed a revolution in 1776.…
100% match26 July 2011…uments about the Cowgill case. First is a declaration of the Committee of Inspection and Observation for Kent County, a group associated with the rebel Continental Congress: In Committee, DoverJanuary 4, 1776 Resolved, That the keeping up the credit of the Continental currency is essential to support the United Colonies in their virtuous opposition to ministerial oppression, and that the…
100% match24 June 2008…e Friends on the subject of paying Taxes, etc. (see The Picket Line, 22 May 2008) in 1776. He thought that Quakers ought to be paying their taxes willingly to the Continental Congress, while the orthodox opinion in his Meeting said no. He was disowned by the Sandwich (Massachusetts) Monthly Meeting i…
100% match24 July 2013…y their Meekness, Humility and patient Suffering, that they are the Followers of the Prince of Peace. Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of 1776 met in September, just a little more than two months after the original fourth of July. As we have seen, pressure on the peaceable testimony had been growing over the previous few years. In…
100% match24 July 2013…s done through Strife, or Contention, but by their Meekness, Humility and patient Suffering, that they are the Followers of the Prince of Peace. Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of 1776 met in September, just a little more than two months after the original fourth of July. As we have seen, pressure on the peaceable testimony had been…
100% match24 July 2013…e Prince of Peace. Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of 1776 met in September, just a little more than two months after the original fourth of July. As we have seen, pressure on the peaceable testimony had been growing over the previous few years. In the face of this, the Yearly Meeting minuted:…
100% match24 July 2013…The attempt to collect the tax against that kind of opposition was not worth the effort, and the futility of trying eventually became apparent. Finally, Lyle Tatum examined the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting’s activity around 1776. Excerpts: Although the Yearly Meeting was clear that members should not participate in military activities or pay direct war taxes, some areas were more difficult to decide. Bi…
100% match23 January 2011…Happersett ruling. In the course of her testimony, she alluded to the tax resistance of Julie and Abby Smith: It was the tax on tea — woman’s drink prerogative — which precipitated the rebellion of 1776. To allay the irritation of the colonies, all taxes were rescinded save that on tea, which was left to indicate King George’s dominion. But our revolutionary fathers and mothers said, “No; the tax is paltry, but the…
100% match22 May 2008…The text of this pamphlet can also be found in the book American Quaker War Tax Resistance. Here’s another rarity: a 1776 pamphlet from Timothy Davis urging his fellow-Quakers to consider the rebel Continental Congress to be their legitimate government, and to pay taxes for its support. There was a variety of Quaker tax resistance…
100% match22 June 2011…being sold now, and some of my brethren are being put into prison, because we will not pay the rate.” And with his eyes flashing, like the eyes of a Boston Tea Party man, and with clenched fist, he repeated, “But I will not pay the rate.” (prolonged applause. The spirit of ’76 still lives.) I’ve hunted in vain for any indication that Clifford tried to introduce the tactic of tax resistance to the anti-war movement of the day.…
100% match22 August 2011…he thumb of the papists (that is, James Ⅱ) again. The Declaration is a good predecessor of the better-known one of 1776, but much more interesting reading. Here’s a nice excerpt: …extraordinary and intolerable Fees extorted from every one upon all occaſions, without any Rules but thoſe of t…
100% match19 December 2006…they had to resort to petition for all the exemptions they enjoyed. The petition for freedom from military service is not to be found anywhere in the published records, but a resolution recorded in the minutes of the Constitutional Convention of 1776 shows us what its contents must have been. Under date of July 6, the following entry occurs in the Journal on the reading of the petition of the “Society of Mennonites and German Ba…
100% match19 December 2006…dom from military service is not to be found anywhere in the published records, but a resolution recorded in the minutes of the Constitutional Convention of 1776 shows us what its contents must have been. Under date of July 6, the following entry occurs in the Journal on the reading of the petition of the “Society of Mennonites and German Baptists:” Resolved that the several committees of obser…
100% match17 June 2013…shillings, looking glass 3 pounds, iron shod cask and tackling, 14 pounds; a horse 18 pounds 14 shillings. 1781, Jacob Lawrence with three others, took a riding saddle worth 5 pounds. And a Warming Pan 1776. Taken from John Lawrence by the militia sergeant, for not appearing under arms, a warming pan to the value of 1 pound. 1780. Taken from John Farrington, a gun worth 2 pounds; a…
100% match17 June 2013…ooking glass worth 3 pounds. 1776, August 29. Taken from John Bowne by the Major of the Light Horse for the use of the army, 21 old sheep at 13 shillings each, and 15 lambs at 11 shillings each; and on Sept. 9, taken by Capt. Moxsome, 21 bushels of oats at 3 shillings per bushels. 1776…
100% match17 June 2013…h. 1776. Taken from Daniel Bowne for refusing military by Capt. Hoogland’s warrant, a silver watch worth 27 pounds and a looking glass worth 3 pounds. 1776, August 29. Taken from John Bowne by the Major of the Light Horse for the use of the army, 21 old sheep at 13 shillings each, and 15 lambs at 11 shillings each; and on…
100% match17 June 2013…Jr., of Jamaica, and which appeared in the Long Island Times of June 17, 1875. The Friends were for the most part conscientious objectors and persecuted as such. 1776. Taken from Daniel Bowne for refusing military by Capt. Hoogland’s warrant, a silver watch worth 27 pounds and a looking glass worth 3 pounds.…
100% match17 June 2013…shillings each; and on Sept. 9, taken by Capt. Moxsome, 21 bushels of oats at 3 shillings per bushels. 1776. Distresses made upon the goods of Ebenezer Beaman by order of the militia officers. A dictionary worth 12 shillings; 2 large pewter basins, 16 shillings; diaper, tablecloth, and pewter tunnel, 28 shillings, looking…
100% match17 July 2013…ons that had taken place during the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting’s proceedings. Among these was this paragraph: Twenty cents of every tax dollar is used in actual killing of our fellow man. Friends recalled the 1776 statement by Philadelphia Yearly Meeting on the use of our bodies and our resources, which has never been rescinded. That Minute, reading as follows, might well be our statement in 1969:…
100% match15 December 2012…hich they made the case that the government was essentially bankrupt, and they urged people to withdraw their deposits from the banks in gold rather than in untrustworthy government notes, and to demand their wages in gold. During the American revolut…
100% match14 May 2008…rom a clear conviction of Truth in their own minds; showing forth, by their meekness, humility, and patient suffering, that they are followers of the Prince of Peace. Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, 1776 It is the judgment of this meeting that a tax levied for the purchasing of drums, colors, or for other warlike uses, cannot be paid consistently with our Christian testimony.…
100% match14 July 2010…Dr. Shaw replied that while she was illegally denied the right of participating in the Government of the State to ask her to make out a list upon which taxes were to be levied would be “heaping injury upon tyranny.” “In the spirit of 1776,” as her statement reads, she “declined to be a party to an act which violated the national Constitution.” So she returned the document unadorned. Dr. Shaw did…
100% match13 May 2011…the 13th of Fifth Month, 1776, I made a visit to my dear friend, Jonathan Farnum, at Uxbridge, who was very far gone in a consumption. I sat up with him during the night and in the morning we had some serious conversation together, in the course of which, after mentioning that he had given up all expectation of recovery, and felt resigned in mind, and willing to leave all, even his dear ch…
100% match13 May 2011…This excerpt can also be found in the book American Quaker War Tax Resistance. On the 13th of Fifth Month, 1776, I made a visit to my dear friend, Jonathan Farnum, at Uxbridge, who was very far gone in a consumption. I sat up with him during…
100% match13 May 2011…On the 13th of Fifth Month, 1776, I made a visit to my dear friend, Jonathan Farnum, at Uxbridge, who was very far gone in a consumption. I sat up with him during the night and in the morning we had some serious conversation together, in the course of which, after mentioning that he had given up all expectation of recovery, and felt resigned…
100% match13 May 2008…k how much of the religious and how much of the economic element was present here? This action was unfortunate. The result was to hasten the decline of the money and to throw the influence of the Society on the side of the British Government. In 1776 North Carolina Quakers declined to vote for delegates to attend the convention, but left Friends to take the paper bills or not. In 1778 they were in doubt whether they were able “to pay…
100% match13 May 2008…dissenting ministers, the same legal exemption as had always been granted to the clergymen of the Church of England. This is the first step in the movement which led up to the sixteenth section of the Virginia Bill of Rights. The act of May, 1776, seems to have been a sort of continuation of the act of 1766. It required Quakers and Menonists to be enlisted in the militia, but exempted them from attending musters. The act o…
100% match13 May 2008…1798. In the gloomy aspect of affairs which greeted them at the beginning of the struggle, Friends were induced to appoint representatives from New England, Virginia and North Carolina to attend the Philadelphia Yearly Meeting in 1776 to consult on the condition of their affairs, and this course was followed during the most of the war. The war brought much distress and suffering to Friends. In this extremity the noble character of the creed of Fri…
100% match10 September 2012…of property. To Miss Anthony’s plea it is objected, somewhat lamely, that the property of minors, aliens, and idiots is taxed, although they are not voters. Minors, aliens, idiots, and insane persons were taxed without representation in 1776, but that did not seem to our forefathers a sufficient reason why sane adults should be taxed in the same way, and they fought the war of the Revolution upon that argument. It is not likely that Miss Anthony will get…
100% match10 September 2012…state demands that the citizen thus illegally denies her rights, shall in addition be the state’s accomplice in this unconstitutional act by making out a list upon which taxes may be levied, this is heaping injury upon tyranny. In the spirit of 1776 Dr. Shaw declined to be a party to an act which violated the National Constitution. She returned the document without making out the list. “But in declining t…
100% match9 July 2013…article that recounted the results of the survey of Baltimore Yearly Meetings members, the author spent some time recounting how the Baltimore Yearly Meeting had coped with these issues in the distant past: In the spring of 1776 Baltimore Yearly Meeting added to the Queries: ‘Do you bear a faithful testimony against bearing arms, military services, or contributing to the support of war?’ (italics ours). In…
100% match9 April 2012…to recognize as having the right to levy taxes, in that said parties were never elected by the people as representatives, and therefore by their affecting to levy taxes they violate the first principles of American liberty, baptized in blood in 1776, and hallowed by the memories of ages, which teach us that taxation, to be legal, must be accompanied by representation, without which it is robbery, and should be resisted by good citizens under the motto of “millio…
100% match1 February 2010…nd is still in operation. During the Revolutionary War Bethlehem was often visited by American troops, and upon more than one occasion the brethren were sufferers from military exactions. On the retreat of Washington through New Jersey, December, 1776, Lee’s divison, under the command of General Sullivan, after crossing the Delaware, came to this place, where it encamped on the 17th, and La…
100% match1 February 2010…men, who had already reached more than man’s allotted years. Daniel, the younger of the two, was born at “Boggy Creek,” May, 1782. When the contest between Great Britain and her American Colonies came on, 1776, John Fries espoused the cause of his country, and became an active patriot. He was already enrolled in the militia and had command of a company. We are not able to say at what period he was first called into service…
100% match1 February 2010…from military exactions. On the retreat of Washington through New Jersey, December, 1776, Lee’s divison, under the command of General Sullivan, after crossing the Delaware, came to this place, where it encamped on the 17th, and La Fayette spent some time there to recover from the wound received at Brandywine. In the spring of 1778, the single Sisters presented…
100% match1 February 2010…d, and settled in Wrightstown among the first settlers. He was commissioned captain in the 4th Pennsylvania regiment, commanded by Col. Anthony Wayne, January 5, 1776; serving in the campaign in Canada of that year, returning home on the recruiting service in December. He shortly afterward resigned his commission, bec…
100% match1 February 2010…725 to 1813, is situated in a delightful country, six miles from the Delaware and twenty-five from Philadelphia. The population is about 1500. It was to this place Washington brought the captured Hessians from Trenton, December 26, 1776. Bristol is on the west bank of the Delaware, opposite Burlington, N.J., twenty miles above Philadelphia. It was made the…
100% match1 February 2010…7, the house in which they worshipped being built as early as 1742. Millarstown, now called Macungie, signifying “the feeding place of bears,” and laid out by Peter Millar about 1776, is situated at the foot of South Mountain on the East Penn. railroad, nine miles from Allentown. It was incorporated in…
100% match1 February 2010…1722, died 1775, and was buried at the Trumbauersville church. Henry, one of the sons, made powder for the Penna. Committee of Safety, 1776, at a mill on Swamp creek. Another son, John Jacob, was probably the “Jacob Hoover” mentioned here. This was in 1859; the present owner we do not know.…
100% match1 February 2010…commanded by Col. Anthony Wayne, January 5, 1776; serving in the campaign in Canada of that year, returning home on the recruiting service in December. He shortly afterward resigned his commission, because of some unjust treatment by Colonel Wayne, but continued his activity in the cause of the Colonies. He was commissioned a Sub-Lieutenant of…
50% match26 October 2007…iction is sin: therefore I chose rather to suffer in this world, than incur the displeasure of him from whom come all my consolation and blessings. Things turned out just fine: Having for nearly a year declined taking the paper currency, agreeably to the secret persuasion which I had of my duty therein, as before mentioned, I have now the satisfaction of comparing the different rewards of obedience an…
33% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 2 February 1838…se people had been opposed to their own government, and thrown every obstacle in its way. He could show that they had not been patriots, but on the contrary, enemies of their country, prior to the French Canadian War and during the revolution of 1774–5–6. At both periods these people had shown great enmity to their own government. They not only stood out against the demands of the governor for men and money, but they did all they possibly could to induce oth…
33% match1 February 2010…s occupied in a store, taught school a year; then studied law, and was admitted to the bar, 1777. He took an active part in the Revolution, and was Secretary of the County Committee of Safety from 1776 to 1778; was appointed a justice of the peace, 1777, and military storekeeper at Easton, March 11, 1778. He was sheriff of the count…
10% match19 August 2013…y have resorted to, to cover or protect his servility. An article in the November issue mentioned in passing that “Quakers withdrew almost as a single body from the Pennsylvania legislature in the 1770s rather than vote taxes for war.” An obituary notice for Wally Nelson (not, I believe, a Quaker, but the obituary says he “demonstrated the values and commitment of a Friend; by his loving manner and u…
8% match27 August 2011…27 August 2011 A book containing the handwritten minutes of the men’s portion of the Chesterfield [New Jersey] Monthly Meeting from 1774 to 1786 is on-line, and contains a lot of good data about how meetings dealt with those members who weren’t going along with the official testimony against paying militia exemption fines. Here are some exa…
8% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1838-1840)…Edward Gibbon The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (1776–1788) Critical Observations on the Sixth Book of the Aeneid (1770) Memoirs of My Life (…
7% match26 December 2012…pirit” of resistance but were “not a little pleas’d to hear that McIntosh has the Credit of the Whole Affair.”3… “The Colonial Merchants and the American Revolution, 1763–1776,” by Arthur Meier Schlesinger; Vol. ⅬⅩⅩⅧ, Whole Number 182, of “Studies in History, Economics, and Public Law,” edited by the faculty of politic…
5% match20 February 2008…s, Jewish Zealots resisted the poll tax of the Roman occupiers of Palestine. In the mid-18th Century many Quakers refused to pay taxes to finance the French and Indian War. In the 1760s and 70’s, American protests at taxation without representation led to tax boycotts, which ultimately triggered the American War of Independence. William Wilberforce used tax boycott to increase pre…
3% match7 September 2011…between groups of Indians, Presbyterian settlers, the crown-aligned Anglican absentee proprietaries, and Quakers in pre-revolutionary Pennsylvania. I read it largely to give me some more context as to what was going on in Pennsylvania in the 1750–1780 period that was so important to the development of American Quaker war tax resistance. It was an interesting read, though a depressing one. Pennsylvania seems at the time to have been one massacre afte…
3% match25 July 2013…IRS. In the 15 April issue, Allyn Eccleston compared the reemerging Quaker opposition to paying for war to the emergence of Quaker abolitionism in American in the mid-18th century. Excerpts: Today we have a different impediment in our relationship with God and we are called, each one of us, to hold it to the ligh…
3% match22 October 2007…f, as Job Scott informs us, that it must be clearly against paying taxes which are specially for war; and this principle became incorporated in the discipline of the Society. Philadelphia Yearly Meeting makes record accordingly, at different times from 1755 to 1790, and offenders were considered disownable. Ohio Yearly Meeting, afterwards established, has similarly recorded its judgment and decision. This subject of taxes occupied much time in our m…
3% match26 October 2007…de for raising money to defray the expenses of war, by means of a duty laid on imported articles of almost every kind. This duty, I believed, was instead of taxing the inhabitants, as had been done some time before. I had felt myself restrained, for thirty or forty years, from paying such taxes; the proceeds whereof were applied, in great measure, to defray expenses relating to war: and, as herein before-mentioned, my refusal was from a tender conscientious…
2% match12 May 2008…de for raising money to defray the expenses of war, by means of a duty laid on imported articles of almost every kind. This duty, I believed, was instead of taxing the inhabitants, as had been done some time before. I had felt myself restrained, for thirty or forty years, from paying such taxes; the proceeds whereof were applied, in great measure, to defray expenses relating to war: and, as herein before-mentioned, my refusal was from a tender conscientious…
2% match24 April 2008…e was a tendency to react in repulsion to the compromises of politics by retreating from public life: There was growing up in the Society a belief, which was vastly strengthened by the military experiences of the years between 1740 and 1780, that public life was unfavorable to the quiet Divine communion which called for inwardness, not outwardness, and which was the basic principle of Quakerism.… [T]he Yearly Meeting was…
2% match15 June 2014…The Colonial Williamsburg site has posted many issues of the Virginia Gazette, which was published in America during a span of time that included events like the French & Indian War, the Regulator rebellion, and the American Revolution. Today I’ll summarize some of its coverage of the first stage of the Regulator movement:…
2% match23 May 2008…ce of her strength and her weakness. More such stories come from Extracts from the Journal of Elizabeth Drinker from 1759 to 1807, A.D.: Sept. 14 [1779] — This morning…
2% match28 July 2013…icant numbers to withhold whatever portion of our income tax fits our circumstances, in order to make our protest noticed? A review of Conscience in Crisis: Mennonites and Other Peace Churches in America, 1739–1789, Interpretation and Documents in the 1 June issue, summarized its version of the history of Quaker war tax resistance this way:…
2% matchExcerpts from Thoreau’s juvenilia…From a September 1835 exercise on the subject of “[t]he comparative moral policy of severe and mild punishments.” William Blackstone (1723–1780) The fact that he was no party man, the leader of no sect, but equally to be feared by the foes of freedom and religion every where, explains the circumstanc…
2% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1852)…t” in W.H. Sleeman’s Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official (1844). “Lord” Timothy Dexter (1748–1806) was a marvelous American eccentric. In Life Without Principle, Thoreau recounts this story and adds: “I may add that…
2% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1852)…1843. The Washington Monument was still under-construction. “Lord” Timothy Dexter (1748–1806) was a marvelous American eccentric. See Genesis 11:1–8…
1% match9 July 2013…d Oliver Stone.” Remembering Quaker history In the 1 March issue, LaVerne Hill Forbush looked back at “Suffering of Friends in Maryland, 1658–1810” and noted that between 1744 and 1810 there were 296 cases of Friends suffering fines in one region, 34 “for refusal to pay priest’s wages, [but] the greater number of fines had to do with military assessments, under such headings as r…
1% match12 May 2008…These excerpts can also be found in the book American Quaker War Tax Resistance. Joshua Evans (1731–1798) left a record in his journal of his war tax resistance around the time of the American Revolution, which led him eventually to avoid all imported goods so as not to pay an excise tax which would go to militar…
1% match1 February 2011…David M. Gross 1 February 2011 In 1802, William Matthews (1747–1816) compiled a book called The Recorder: Being a Collection of Tracts and Disquisitions, Chiefly Relative to the Modern State and Pr…
1% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1853)…ailed. It is no longer so, according to his editor. Nobody legislates for me, for the way would be not to legislate at all. Commons Gilbert White (1720–1793), British naturalist 3 April 1853 The last two Tribunes I have not looked at…
1% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1854)…force of the State, if need be, is at the service of a slaveholder, to enable him to carry back a slave, not a soldier is offered to save a citizen of Massachusetts from being kidnapped. Is this what all these arms, all this “training,” has been for these seventy-eight years past? What is wanted is men of principle, who recognize a higher law than the decision of the majority. The marines and the militia whose bodies were used lately were not men of sense nor of pr…
1% match4 May 2008…These excerpts can also be found in the book American Quaker War Tax Resistance. William Fordyce Mavor (1758–1837), in his Historical Account of the Most Celebrated Voyages, Travels, and Discoveries from the Time of Columbus to the Present Period (1797, pages 300–3) s…
1% match1 February 2010…Senate, and was elected to Congress in 1812, serving two terms. The late Mrs. John Fox, of Doylestown, was his niece, daughter of his Brother Gilbert. Newtown, the county seat of Bucks county from 1725 to 1813, is situated in a delightful country, six miles from the Delaware and twenty-five from Philadelphia. The population is about 1500. It was to this place Washington brought the captured…
1% match5 August 2013…me, some of the most devout Quakers refused to pay a war tax levied by the Pennsylvania Assembly. And finally the yearly meeting agreed that those whose consciences would not allow them to pay the taxes, should not. So the heritage of Pennsylvania until 1776 was that government accommodated the religion. The Federal Constitution allows for an affirmation, because certain religious rights are antecedent to the establishment of the government, and the…
1% match“Letter to the Liberals” by Leo Tolstoy…the seventeenth century. He was eventually defeated and captured, and was executed in Moscow in 1671. — Translator Pugatchef headed the most formidable Russian insurrection of the eighteenth century. He was executed in Moscow in 1775. — Translator The series of reforms, including the abolition of serfdom, which followed the Crimean War and the dea…
1% matchWe Won’t Pay!…1672 letter to the governor of New York explaining why the writers were refusing to pay defense requisitions. “Sufferings in Jamaica” A chronicle of what happened to Jamaican Quakers who refused war requisitions in the 18th century, from Joseph Besse’s A Collection of the Sufferings of the People called Quakers, for the Testimony of a Good Conscience (1753…
1% match31 October 2012…w that we have money and came in here and told us: ‘From this moment you must pay us taxes’,” Kukali’s son Issam said. The Beit Sahour civil disobedience campaign sparked international protests. The residents adopted the slogan of the 18th Century American revolution against British colonial rule: “No taxation without representation”. Less than a month ago Israeli Defence Minist…
1% match24 July 2013…ems began to be lumped together into one, general tax, it was no longer so simple an issue. Some, with a considerable feeling of relief, began to pay; others paid more out of frustration. And one of the most potent testimonies against war during the 1700s became lost. Now, in 1975, probably no reasonable person believes that the billions to be spent for weapons research, deployment of armies and nuclear weapons, nuclear…
1% match23 May 2008…ng goods to make up the tax. This comes from Caroline Hazard’s Thomas Hazard son of Rob’t, call’d College Tom: A Study of Life in Narragansett in the ⅩⅧth Century: [Tom Hazard’s] principles of non-resistance… were very firm; there is no indication that he took any part in the struggle,…
1% match23 August 2013…noted: Throughout these years [the 1950s and early 1960s], he often faced jail and prosecution for refusing to pay income taxes (he constantly followed the dictates of the 18th century Quaker John Woolman, who insisted that “The spirit of truth required of me as an individual to suffer patiently the distress of goods, rather than pay actively”)……
1% match19 August 2013…entions of American war tax resisters recently deceased one mention of a tax resister from the 19th century one mention of American Quaker war tax resistance from the 18th century one contemporary American Quaker Meeting advocating the latest Peace Tax Fund scheme and alluding to the acts of contemporary Quaker war tax resisters…
1% match16 May 2008…16 May 2008 I finally tracked down a copy of a rare tract published around 1715 with the typically-loquacious 18th century title of TRIBUTETOCÆSAR, How paid by the Beſt Chriſtians,And to what Purpoſe.WITH Some Remarks on the late vigorous Expedition againſt CANADA.…
1% match11 January 2005…Britons to also stop using tobacco, coffee, and cotton clothing (much of it woven in the mills of staunchly antislavery Manchester). Nonetheless, a boycott of sugar was potentially a powerful weapon because the country consumed so much of it. In the eighteenth century, sugar was Britain’s largest import.… ¶ Everyone could understand the logic of the sugar boycott, even children.… Quietly but subversively, the boycott added a new dimension to British…
1% match9 August 2005…legally enslaved to him, most of whom were auctioned off on Jefferson’s death to pay his debts. The New York Times Book Review last Sunday highlighted the little-known examples of eighteenth century American slave holders, like Robert Carter, who did what Jefferson insisted he couldn’t do — they emancipated the people they held in slavery. One author wonders why we have heard so little of these p…
1% match5 August 2013…ctions of members of the Society of Friends have come from the peace testimony. For example, Friends’ primary contribution to world history is that they began and carried through the antislavery testimony. Friends became antislavery advocates in the 18th century, when they realized that the only way one could obtain a black slave was to take him or her captive in war. Pennsylvania was founded by William Penn for religious liberty. Penn believed, a…
1% match4 April 2008…1672 letter to the governor of New York explaining why the writers were refusing to pay defense requisitions. “Sufferings in Jamaica” A chronicle of what happened to Jamaican Quakers who refused war requisitions in the 18th century, from Joseph Besse’s A Collection of the Sufferings of the People called Quakers, for the Testimony of a Good Conscience (1753…
1% match1 August 2013…urrently on the books, clearly implying that greater “strength” in this area must be morally superior. In a discussion several months ago at Representative Meeting in Philadelphia, those who obey the law were compared to the Quaker slaveholders of the 18th century, and not a dissenting voice was raised. As a member of the substantial majority of Friends who are dutiful taxpayers, I have felt intuitively that my position has every bit as good a moral c…
1% match9 July 2013…ee” featuring the speakers “Jesse Yaukey, Lawrence Scott, and Oliver Stone.” Remembering Quaker history In the 1 March issue, LaVerne Hill Forbush looked back at “Suffering of Friends in Maryland, 1658–1810” and noted that between 1744 and 1810 there were 296 cases of Friends suffering fines in one region, 34 “for refusal to pay priest’s wages, [but] the greater number of fines h…
1% match17 September 2005…dence of the general sense of mankind, as to the practical necessity there is that all men’s important contracts, especially those of a permanent nature, should be both written and signed, the following facts are pertinent. For nearly two hundred years — that is, since 1677 — there has been on the statute book of England, and the same, in substance, if not precisely in letter, has been re-enacted, and is now in force, in nearly or quite all…
1% match13 December 2012…r the Friends’ Intelligencer advised readers how to structure their estates and bequests so as to avoid the “United States ‘war tax’.” French farmers in the 17th and 18th centuries used (and shared among themselves) every legal trick they could discover (and several less legal ones besides) to reduce or…
0% match30 May 2008…today’s and tomorrow’s entries, as I’ll be off the grid for a few days. In Lillian Schlissel’s Conscience in America: A documentary history of conscientious objection in America, 1757–1967 (1968) is an excerpt from a letter to the Pennsylvania Assembly from 1795 that I haven’t been able to find elsewhere, and the author of which re…
0% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1852)…) Samuel Ayer (1654–1708) Joseph Bartlett’s narrative of captivity can be found as an appendix to Sketch of the History of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury, from 1635–1845 (1845) by Joshua Coffin René Hertel de Chambly (1675–1708) A brother of…
0% match12 November 2005…Bush took office (and he did take it), his government has borrowed $1.05 trillion. That is to say, over one thousand billion. Remember how many a billion is? $1.05 trillion is more than the total borrowed by every administration between 1776 and 2000 ($1.01 trillion). The mind implodes. Half of this nation’s debt in 224 years, the other half since Junior Bush got the top job. Remember how far away the sun is? We have spent enough d…
0% match23 August 2013…etter to the Pennsylvania assembly concerning a royal levy, [a portion of the PDF is illegible at this point] -tion of Christ and Fox. As reported by Peter Brock in his The Quaker Peace Testimony, 1660–1914, it states in part: And being painfully apprehensive that the large sum granted by the… Assembly for the King’s use is principally intended for purposes in…
0% match24 April 2008…We Won’t Pay!: A Tax Resistance Reader is complete and I’ve finished patting myself on the back for a job well done, I’ve started to work on a spin-off project: a reader that concentrates on war tax resistance by American Quakers from the 17th through the 19th century. I planned to take the existing sections of this material from We Won’t Pay! and add a littl…
0% match6 July 2013…r tax resistance had been, that in 1960 war tax resistance could be described in a Quaker publication as possibly “emerging as a new testimony.” (The same issue has an article titled “The Quaker Peace Testimony, 1660–1960: Some Suggestions for Witness and Rededication” that doesn’t mention taxes at all.) In the 1 November issue, in an article on “The Peace Testimony and the Monthly Mee…
0% match24 December 2013…1 to 11. And when we women, individually, tried to reason with our men we were told, almost in chorus: “‘Dear ladies, to give you the suffrage, we would have to change our Constitution. And ladies — ladies — that has been changed only since 1629! [sic]’” “Now,” ask the women of Bermuda, “what are you going to do with men who haven’t yet emerged from the sixteen hundreds? How are we going to prevail upon them?” St…
0% match5 August 2013…as an extract from J. William Frost’s Tax Court testimony in the Deming case, in which he explained the Quaker war tax resistance practice: The peace testimony has been a basic part of Quaker religious belief since the 1660s. The testimony has not been static; it has evolved over time as Friends thought out the implications of what it meant to be a bringer of peace. Some of the most creative actions of members of…
0% match1 March 2013…to military tax payment on the part of CFS employees will be accepted as an appropriate stance, in keeping with the Friends Peace Testimony established and upheld by Quakers since its original expression in 1660.” At present, the letter is in the hands of the IRS. Regardless of the outcome, the school…
0% match1 December 2009…9 Bibliography The following excerpt from John Thomas Ball’s The Reformed Church of Ireland (1537–1886) concerns resistance to mandatory tithes by Irish Catholics in the 1830s. The value of the tithes levied at this time in Ireland may be reckoned at about six hundr…