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100% matchRefusing to Pay Wicked Taxations Vindicated (1687)…the false Bishops and Clergy may be seen before, part 1. period 3. pages 28,29. The general Assembly, in their Declaration, dated Jullij ult: 1648. concerning the then unlawful engadgement in a War against England, plainly & positively Dehorteth all members of the Kirke of Scotland from contributing any assistance thereunt…
100% matchRefusing to Pay Wicked Taxations Vindicated (1687)…sinful. And accordingly in the time of Montrose, the Gen. Ass. made an Act for Censuring the Complyers with the Publick Enemies of this Church & Kingdom, Jun. 17. 1646. Sess. 14. See Part 1. Per. 5. Pag. 82. Where these Exactions are extorted only as badges…
100% matchRefusing to Pay Wicked Taxations Vindicated (1687)…& wicked Taxations arbitrarily imposed and levied, for the most dreadful, Sacrilegious and hellish ends that ever was published to the world, far exceeding in wickedness these testified against by the Assembly 1648, or any formerly. While the Watchmen have so far abandoned their duty of setting the trumpet to their mouth, and giveing due warning of the sin and danger of those dreadfull and Judge…
100% match“Sir Walter Raleigh” by H.D. Thoreau…ys, Shuts up the story of our days! But from this earth, this grave, this dust, The Lord shall raise me up, I trust! [34] His execution was appointed on Lord Mayor’s day, that the pageants and shows might divert the attention of the people; but those pageants have long since been forgotten, while this tragedy…
100% match“Sir Walter Raleigh” by H.D. Thoreau…ses if they were not overshadowed by the number and variety of his pursuits. [11] His persevering care and oversight as the patron of Virginia, discovered and planted under his auspices in 1584, present him in an interesting light to the American reader. The work of colonization was well suited to his genius; and if the necessity of England herself had not required his attention and presence at this time, he w…
100% match“Sir Walter Raleigh” by H.D. Thoreau…hom those juster wars are not simply the dire necessity he would imply. [6] In whatever he is engaged we seem to see a plume waving over his head, and a sword dangling at his side. Born in 1552, the last year of the reign of Edward Ⅵ, we find that not long after, by such instinct as makes the young…
100% match“Sir Walter Raleigh” by H.D. Thoreau…as he was, preparing for voyages and adventures which would require him to roam more broadly than was consistent with the comfort or ambition of his freest contemporaries. [21] Already in 1595, eight years before his imprisonment, it will be remembered he had undertaken his first voyage to Guiana in person; mainly, it is said, to recover favor with the Queen,…
100% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 24 October 1837, part 1…ery difficult to prevail upon them even to exercise the right of suffrage, except at those times when they believe the bulwarks of the Constitution to be assailed, when they will come to its defense. This sect originated in Triesland in the year one thousand five hundred and fifty. Their great founder was Mennon, who was a man of piety and learning — of so great learning, that among his sect, he was considered as an oracle. His influence was very great in suppres…
100% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1858)…Indeed, it is, accordingly, only what may be called “respectable Christianity” that is at all generally embraced in the 2 countries. The Blazon of Gentrie by John Ferne (1586) 27 December 1858 Talk of fate! How little one can know what is fated to another! what he can…
100% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1854)…29 December 1854 6 January 1854 In Vimont’s1 Jesuit Relation2 for 1642, he describes the customs of the Iroquois. As in the case of the Hurons, everything is done by presents. The murderer and robber are restrained by the very defect of justice, and because the community (his relations or…
100% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1853)…hn Smith. “No place known had better walls nor a broader ditch.” The English did not stumble upon them in their first voyages to Virginia, and the Englishman who was ever in them was wrecked on them in 1593; yet at the very first planting of them in 1612 with some sixty persons, the first Governor the same year “built and laid the foundations of eight or nine forts” (!!), to be ready, one would say, to entertain the first ship company that should be next shipwrecked on…
100% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1853)…This appears nearly verbatim in Cape Cod. The quotes are from Travels of Captaine John Smith (1624). 23 March 1853 Without being the owner of any land, I find that I have a civil right in the river — that, if I am not…
100% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1838-1840)…d him could see it done. See also: Sir Walter Raleigh Thomas Overbury (1581–1613). The quote comes from his “Arraignment of Sir Walter Raleigh”. Walter Raleigh (1552?–1618)…
100% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1838-1840)…Thomas Overbury (1581–1613). The quote comes from his “Arraignment of Sir Walter Raleigh”. Walter Raleigh (1552?–1618) 21 August 1840 The humane society1 will not make the hunter despicable s…
100% match31 December 2012…victory is by convincing the government to either formally rescind the tax, or to recognize the legal validity of tax resistance. Charles Ⅰ went around Parliament to create a new property tax, and John Hampden famously said “no” in 1637. He lost his court case, but the next Parliament legalized his resistance by voiding the “ship-writs” tax and declaring the court judgement against him invalid. American Amish, after a long campaign of lobby…
100% match30 May 2014…n contrary to his belief is taught, nor to help pay teachers who must undergo a denominational religious test before they are allowed to practice their profession. It is precisely the same spirit which caused the Pilgrims to emigrate to America in 1620, for just as the Government was trying to force a state religion upon the people then, so it is trying to strengthen that religion now by proselytizing the children of Nonconformist parents.” One of the mo…
100% match30 July 2013…tire. Such “trophy money,” as these direct taxes were called, many early Friends refused to pay. Most, however, paid the general or “mixed” taxes even in time of war. Their willingness may be found in the advice of the 1656 gathering at Balby encouraging “all who are indebted to the world endeavor to discharge the same.” As Fox put it in 1661, “Keep out of debt; owe to no man anything but love… Pay to Caesar…
100% match30 December 2011…ng less than half of what they paid earlier on a single crop.” Collectively, they reduced a nominal 10% tax to an actual 1.5% one. Scott then looks at the French tithe resisters in the light of this. He notes some overt, acute resistance (“In 1615, the residents of one commune refused to pay the wine tithe and threatened to throw the collector into the Rhône. In 1682, another village, led by its curé, stoned the monks and their tithe…
100% match24 April 2010…the fleet against the Armada were derived; and they were the result of ship writs, issued according to precedent, to London and the other port towns, requiring them to furnish ships and their equipment for the defence of the kingdom. Thus also, in 1618, the greater number (12 out of 18) of the vessels employed in the attack on Algiers — the only warlike operation by sea undertaken by James Ⅰ. — were ships hired from…
100% match24 April 2010…ses of the preparations for the campaign in Scotland. But this parliament, subsequently known as the short parliament, was dissolved as soon as it appeared probable that they would refuse to proceed at once to the question of supply. In September the king summoned a great council of peers and laid before them the difficulties of his case, and on their advice, summoned in November the fifth, subsequently known as the…
100% match24 April 2010…others, but also because it was their duty of allegiance to defend the sea coast and keep up the honour of the king there,” for which reason writs were sent to them on this occasion.1 The writs were issued on October 20, 1634. There was no opposition to this levy, which, after all, was not an unprecedented charge, though some towns petitioned against what they regarded as an overestimate of the proportion of the…
100% match24 April 2010…ntinued the levy of ship money. A third issue of ship writs, similar to those issued on the second occasion in 1635, was ordered in August 1636, and they produced £202,240 And in September 1637 there was a fourth issue of writs. Although under the new assessments, the ship money was, certainly, more fairly assessed than any fifteenth and tenth or subsidy hitherto collected — for indeed…
100% match24 April 2010…king, which were demanded as for “gifts” and “benevolences,” or under the specious pretext of “loans;” and these attempts at exaction and any tax of the kind had been suppressed by the Petition of Eight, to which the king had given his assent in 1628. There was nothing new in the use of ship writs. They formed a well-known means of getting together a navy in times of war. Before the invention of cannon there w…
100% match24 April 2010…gainst Hampden. The hearing of the case and the decision of the judges that Hampden should be charged with the sum assessed on him. The grounds for that decision. The extrajudicial opinion given by all the judges on the case submitted to them in February 1636, and, That other cases were then depending in the court of exchequer and in some other courts against other persons, for the like kind of charge, grounded upon the said writs commonly called ship writs, a…
100% match24 April 2010…by James Ⅰ. — were ships hired from private merchants; and on this occasion the port towns had been required to provide ships, and ship money was levied for the purpose. And lastly, as late as in 1626, when we were at war with Spain, the seaports had been required, after the dissolution of parliament, to provide and maintain a fleet of ships for three months. But all these were war precedents, and applied…
100% match24 April 2010…Peter Wentworth, the sheriff, was ordered himself to make the necessary assessment. While troubles of the same kind occurred in Devonshire and other places. In these circumstances the king caused a case to be submitted to the judges, in February, 1636, for their opinion as to the legality of the levy and his power to enforce payment of the ship money, and the twelve judges, viz., the justices of the courts of…
100% match24 April 2010…to obtain a legal decision upon the point. The king, confident in the opinion expressed by the judges, had no reason to offer any opposition to the course proposed, and Hampden’s, made a test case, came on for hearing in the court of exchequer in November 1637. In cases of great importance and difficulty arising in one of the three superior courts of law, it was usual to adjourn the case into the exchequer chamber, a court which, for this purpose, cons…
100% match24 April 2010…they would refuse to proceed at once to the question of supply. In September the king summoned a great council of peers and laid before them the difficulties of his case, and on their advice, summoned in November the fifth, subsequently known as the Long Parliament. This parliament, after passing the Triennial Act and the Bill of Attainder against Strafford, settled the question of tunnage and poundage by granting t…
100% match24 April 2010…that the grounds on which the council had advised the step were that “since all the kingdom was interested both in the honour, safety and profit, it was just and reasonable that they should all put to their helping hands.” Accordingly on August 18, 1635, a second issue of ship writs was ordered, to extend to inland as well as maritime counties and towns. In these writs the recital of the reasons for the issue was altered so as to suit the…
100% match24 April 2010…refusal is also told in the book We Won’t Pay!: A Tax Resistance Reader. At last, the king was compelled to summon a parliament, April 1640, in order to provide for the expenses of the preparations for the campaign in Scotland. But this parliament, subsequently known as the short parliament, was dissolved as soon as it appeared probable that the…
100% match24 April 2010…for several days; and in the result, it was decided by a majority of the judges that Hampden should be charged with the sum assessed on him, the main grounds and reasons for the decision being those of the extrajudicial opinion of the judges in February 1636. The story of John Hampden’s tax refusal is a…
100% match24 April 2010…courts of chancery, king’s bench, common pleas and exchequer, and also entered among the remembrances of the court of star chamber; and thus fortified, he continued the levy of ship money. A third issue of ship writs, similar to those issued on the second occasion in 1635, was ordered in August 1636, and they produced £202,240 And in September 1637 there was a fourth issue of writs.…
100% match24 April 2010…among the remembrances of the court of star chamber; and thus fortified, he continued the levy of ship money. A third issue of ship writs, similar to those issued on the second occasion in 1635, was ordered in August 1636, and they produced £202,240 And in September 1637 there was a fourth issue of writs. Although under the new assessments, the ship money was, certainly, more fairly…
100% match22 October 2007…discipline or in the writings of Friends, that I have met with, disapproving of paying customs and duties, simply as such, I will now bring forward a powerful testimony of a faithful Friend that they ought to be paid. William Edmundson, soon after he was convinced of the truth of the principles of Friends, was engaged in selling goods in Ireland, which he bought in England, and he writes: Whilst I was at sea, self reasoned strongly to save the…
100% match22 May 2008…o his own hands, and governed the kingdom himself, under the character of lord protector. —  Here we do contend but that Friends who had paid their allegiance and their taxes to the king, continued to pay them to Oliver Cromwell, during the time he held the reins of government; And what can be said of him, but that he headed the populace, and was as opposer of kingly authority, not merely as such, but as it became, through the hands of the king, subversive…
100% match22 May 2008…have arisen since their time, concerning regal authority, and on whom it ought to devolve. For a farther consideration hereat, you may remember, that Friends made their appearance in the reign of King Charles the first; who by his too much aspiring after sovereignty or despotism alarmed the people; who, headed by…
100% match20 August 2008…evolutionary step to walk through that invisible barrier to a more meaningful life. Here is a short quote from The Politics of Obedience: A Discourse on Voluntary Servitude, written by Etienne De La Boetie in 1550. The book can be found online, although I find this intro to the essay to be even better. “Every tyranny must ne…
100% match19 February 2010…Robert Peel hides in the gatehouse. I’ve since found an even earlier example. During the “Western Rising” of 1626–1632, protesters were led by men dressed in women’s clothing who collectively used the alias “Lady Skimmington.” “Skimmington” comes from the name…
100% match17 December 2004…matter of ripping the flesh off children, we have regressed. We weren’t always so vicious; at least we tried not to be. Perhaps we will try again — but not until we realize how low we have sunk. Neumann goes on to describe how about 400 years ago reformers like Hugo Grotius started to develop standards that would protect the innocent during war. “From Grotius’ time until sometime after the F…
100% match17 August 2011…outhwest had traditionally been exempt from this tax. Now, suddenly, the new king Henri Ⅱ tried to impose it, with inflammatory results. Crowds of rebels assembled to protest, and for five days from August 17 to August 22, 1548, mobs roamed the streets setting fire to tax collectors’ houses. Some attacked the homes of anyone who looked rich, until the disorder threatened to turn into a general…
100% match17 August 2011…How to Live: or, A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer. Unexpected to me, there’s a mention of tax resistance (one of the Gabelle Riots) in the early pages: [In 1548] upheavals broke out in Bordeaux…: the salt-tax riots, which would cause such stress to Montaigne’s father during his term as mayor. The southwest had traditionally been exempt from this tax. Now, suddenly, the new k…
100% match16 May 2008…l me I may spare my labor etc. Granted, I answer: if he that knew not his Master’s mind was beat, what must be done to them that knew it and did it not? That this was our faith sixty years ago, I remember, ay, and believe, had been our practice now at this time, had not a long-headed state’s politician decoyed into the foil, as ducks are. But is it not a pity that we that began…
100% match15 August 2004…in the United States took unpopular stands against paying for war bonds during World War Ⅱ, but most didn’t argue with the income tax. The paper quotes a letter from the Hutterian Brethren to Lord Frederich von Zerotin of Moravia in 1579 in which they plead for some way to be considered good citizens without paying war taxes: “Our greatest fear, however… is that only the name, but not the tax would be changed, so that we would be led into it…
100% match14 October 2012…ooting. “All the rich and noble persons who were concerned in the farming of tolls, as well as all members of the government, saw their houses demolished. … Above forty palaces and houses were consumed by the flames on this day, or were razed to the ground…” During the French Gabelle Riots of 1548, “for five days… mobs roamed the streets setting fire to tax collectors’ houses.”…
100% match14 October 2012…ay be no more of thy race.’” In 1736, French tithe resisters “wearing disguises sacked the granary of the tithe collector, and no witnesses could be found to testify against them.” In Naples, in 1647, “the populace began to attack the houses of those whom they knew had, by farming tolls or in any other way, become rich at the expense of the people. … [T]he houses were emptied: first that of the cashier o…
100% match14 October 2012…andalism, not looting. “All the rich and noble persons who were concerned in the farming of tolls, as well as all members of the government, saw their houses demolished. … Above forty palaces and houses were consumed by the flames on this day, or were razed to the ground…” During the French Gabelle Riots of 1548, “for five days… mobs roamed the streets setting fire to tax collectors’ house…
100% match13 October 2012…heir underwear, Hudson advised them that “this is part of the punishment we are going to give the white man for injustices done the black man.” During the salt tax (gabelle) riots in Bordeaux in 1548, “A few tax collectors were killed. Their bodies were dragged through the streets and covered in heaps of salt to underline the point.” In 1881, Irish settlers i…
100% match13 February 2005…ance League: So what’s a man doing on the banner of a women’s suffrage group? And what’s the “Ship 1627 Money” legend all about? The story of John Hampden’s tax refusal is to…
100% match12 October 2012…cked, they “broke the gates, posts, walls, and toll-boards into pieces so small that in the morning there was not a piece of the timber larger than would make matches” Toll-booth destruction was also part of the riots in Naples in 1647: “the toll-booths throughout the town were demolished; the mob went from one gate to another. Everywhere the toll-gatherers had escaped — nobody thought of making any resistance…” Toll-booth attacks are…
100% match12 June 2010…on our belief that the Gospel of Christ is a gospel of peace. The nonresistant principles held by this religious body are founded on the teachings of the Scriptures and are set forth in their confession of faith adopted at Dortnecht, Holland, in 1632. Can Support Red Cross. “It has always been an essential principle in our creed. First we owe our allegiance to God, second we owe our allegiance to our government. That does not mean that we hav…
100% match11 October 2012…of July, 1830, against the combined imposts[, s]even or eight thousand vine-dressers burnt the archives and tax-offices and dragged an employé through the streets, shouting out at each street-lamp, ‘Let him be hung!’” In Naples in 1647, a tax revolt expressed itself with attacks on tax offices: “On one beautiful summer night the custom-house in the great market-place flew up into the air. A quantity of powder had been conveyed into it by unknown han…
100% match10 May 2009…effect that a petition be presented praying that commissioners receive the supplies and that until the Bill pass they be not managed by the Lords of the Treasury — This admirable resolution was adopted from that passed in the House of Commons in 1642. The House to day need not allow one shilling to pass through the hands of the Treasury Lords; and then what would become of the poor miserable pauper peers, who were themselves, he would again repeat it, unable to b…
100% match8 November 2007…the lords of the Treasury, but should be paid over to commissioners named by the House of Commons; and this was specifically recommended to them on the ground, that it was taken from “that admirable resolution adopted by the House of Commons in 1642: “while another patriot assured them the question was, whether the King’s government was to be brought into disgrace and peril, not paralleled except by the execution of…
100% match7 November 2012…he said. In Beit Sahour, when the Israeli occupation authorities seized furniture and appliances from resisters, relatives and others would loan them spares, or camping furniture to use as replacements. “In Bedfordshire in 1657 community pressure persuaded a minister to return goods seized from a Quaker for non-payment of tithes.” Moral support When Dora Montefiore was first formulating her “siege” strategy…
100% match7 July 2012…stianity: The Huterites (led by Jacob Hunter [sic]) took refuge in Moravia about 1535. English Quakers found them at Pressburg in Hungary in 1661. Their general views were almost identical with the Mennonite Baptists, but they practised communism, and carried their peace p…
100% match7 July 2012…concerns the founding and early years of the Quakers. It includes this mention of Quakers being fined after being appointed Militia Commissioners under Oliver Cromwell but refusing to equip and man militias: In 1655 Cromwell appointed new Militia Commissioners for the English and Welsh counties, upon whom rested the duty of raising a force. The horses, arms, and money required were to be obtained from Royalist estates, and used…
100% match7 July 2011…gry and unmerciful, and every day seemed to bring the outbreak nearer. On one beautiful summer night the custom-house in the great market-place flew up into the air. Thus the morning of July 7th, 1647, approached. It was Sunday, and a number of fruit-sellers, with carts and donkeys and full baskets, came into the town very early from Pozzuoli, and went as usual to the gre…
100% match7 July 2011…bishop of Naples acted during the revolutions of the kingdom, so much the more interesting is the account of it written by himself, in a letter addressed to Pope Innocent Ⅹ. “When I left my house yesterday,” he writes on the 6th of July, at the 21st hour, “to go to the Capuchin convent, I perceived that the viceroy…
100% match7 July 2011…The Carafas of Maddaloni: Naples under Spanish dominion (1854) concerning a successful tax revolt in 1647: It is easy to conceive how ill the people spoke of the taxgatherers, who, by their severity and roughness in their daily treatment, kept up perpetual quarrels and ill-will with…
100% match7 July 2011…the abolition of the taxes. He took an oath in the church of the Carmelites that the promise should be kept: the people refused to believe him. The rioting and thorough destruction of property continued on the 9th of July: All the rich and noble persons who were concerned in the farming of tolls, as well as all members of the government, saw their houses…
100% match7 July 2011…much the more interesting is the account of it written by himself, in a letter addressed to Pope Innocent Ⅹ. “When I left my house yesterday,” he writes on the 6th of July, at the 21st hour, “to go to the Capuchin convent, I perceived that the viceroy was besieged in his palace by from fifty to sixty thousand of t…
100% match7 December 2013…st continuous during the year 1583. Governor Santiago de Vera, who arrived the following year, brought orders from the King for the reform of the system and punished certain encomenderos… but, in spite of reforms, in 1585, the natives of Pampanga and those of Manila confederated with Mohammedan Malay traders from Borneo and planned to fire the city and destroy the Spaniards. Both coasts of the island of Sámar and the island of Leyte w…
100% match7 December 2013…inces after occupation by Spaniards.… Their grievances appear, also, in the frequent risings which occurred in the last years of the sixteenth century. For example, revolts were almost continuous during the year 1583. Governor Santiago de Vera, who arrived the following year, brought orders from the King for the reform of the system and punished certain encomenderos… but, in spite of reforms, in 1585,…
100% match7 December 2013…id in wax, the weight being determined with a false steelyard. They drove the encomendero from the island, and he narrowly escaped with his life, fleeing in a banca to the island of Cebú. Three years later, the island of Leyte rose again, and in 1589, Cagayán flamed into rebellion, and in the town of Dingrás, Ilocos, the natives rose against the collectors of tribute and slew six Spaniards of the pueblo of Vigan. The book quotes Philippine…
100% match7 December 2013…h rigor, for other regions or islands. This fact would explain in many cases the sudden decrease in population of certain shores and provinces after occupation by Spaniards.… Their grievances appear, also, in the frequent risings which occurred in the last years of the sixteenth century. For example, revolts were almost continuous during the year 1583. Governor Santiago de Vera, who arrived the following year, brought orders from t…
100% match7 December 2013…h civil disobedience after losing the snap presidential elections that February. However, she scaled down her call for civil disobedience to a mere boycott of the products of politically tainted “crony corporations.” The 1589 action seems to be known as the “Revolt Against the Tribute,” the “Dingras Revolt,” or the “Ilocos Norte Revolt.” In my casual googling I’ve only found sketchy outlines of this revolt: apparently the fed-up people of th…
100% match7 December 2013…an editorial in the Manila Standard Today, Francisco S. Tatad gave this summary of tax resistance history in the Philippines: In 1589, the provinces of Cagayan, Ilocos Norte and Ilocos Sur rose in revolt over unjust taxes and the alleged abuses of tax collectors. In 1898, several provinces, which had expected a reducti…
100% match6 October 2008…nt and bloody measure, as it would to pay them, and enable the State to commit violence and shed innocent blood.” The Algonquin Indians, long before there was a Constitution or Bill of Rights or the rallying cry of aggrieved colonists, did it in 1637: They refused to pay a Dutch tax on the refurbishment of the same military fort that was the arbiter and symbol of their lost autonomy. We pay for the blood and mess on the hands of this foul fortressed government, w…
100% match4 November 2011…ught before the commissioners of customs on the sixth, and condemned in a fine of five hundred pounds on the sixteenth. Refusing to pay the fine, he was committed to prison on the twelfth of December for contempt. A writ of habeas corpus was moved for in his favour in the following term; but the question stood over beyond Easter on account of some technical informalities.…
100% match4 November 2011…tting, one Cony, a merchant in the city, refused to pay certain custom-house duties on the goods he imported, on the pretence that they were not imposed by a legal authority. For this offence he was brought before the commissioners of customs on the sixth, and condemned in a fine of five hundred pounds on the sixteenth. Refusing to pay the fine, he was committed to prison on the twelfth of Decem…
100% match4 November 2011…th March, 1654. An ordinance of the Protector and his Council (Ord. 1653, c. 15, 20th March, 1653–4) continued them till 26th March, 1658. The Parliament, 1656, confirmed and again continued the customs and excise. He was heard of again in August, 1656,…
100% match4 November 2011…s next appearance being on the last day of term, the affair was ordered to stand over to the next term. In the mean time Rolle represented the difficulties under which he laboured in such a manner to Cromwel, that he received his writ of ease on the seventh of June; and in the following week Glyn was appointed to succeed him as lord chief justice of England. Maynard, Twisden and Windham had previously on their submission been discharged from confinement; an…
100% match4 November 2011…ng term; but the question stood over beyond Easter on account of some technical informalities. He retained three of the most eminent counsel at the bar, Maynard, Twisden and Wadham Windham, to plead for him; and the question came on to be heard on the seventeenth of May. This was an affair of vital importance to the government of Cromwel. An ordinance had been passed by the lord protector and council on the twentieth of…
100% match4 November 2011…n describes as “an eminent fanatik,” and who combined a hatred of the Government with a dislike to taxation, had refused to pay certain customs’ dues, payable under an ordinance of the Protector, continuing an excise duty which had existed since 1647, if not much longer. The power to make such ordinance was conferred on the Protector and his Council by the Instrument of Government, which contained the following clauses:—…
100% match4 November 2011…mmitted to the Tower, and that His Highness sign the warrant for their commitment for using words tending to sedition and subversive of the present Government.” These “three learned and profound lawyers” accordingly went to the Tower, whence, on the 25th May following, they humbly petitioned for their release, and Serjeant Maynard was discharged. On the 1st June Serje…
100% match4 November 2011…ir client; and Maynard in particular urged such arguments, and inforced them with such vigour, as, if ceded to, would have shaken the government to its basis. The cause was argued on the seventeenth of May; and the next day Maynard and his fellow-pleaders were sent to the Tower, on the charge of having held language destructive to the existing government. The case did not end here. The…
100% match4 November 2011…indham was shortly afterwards, in November, 1660, also appointed to a seat on the King’s Bench. Serjeant Maynard’s intervention in the matter seems, however, to have had no very great effect upon Cromwell, who, in May, 1658, appointed him Serjeant to His Highness the Protector, and afterwards, as is suggested, his Solicitor-General, a post which he certainly held under Richard. A great deal has been made of this case to…
100% match4 November 2011…his moderation, and quietly submitted to what was required. Another form of attack was commenced on his government, which with less resolution and constancy on his part would have threatened the most serious consequences. So long ago as the fourth of the last November, while the parliament was still sitting, one Cony, a merchant in the city, refused to pay certain custom-house duties on the goods he imported, on the pretence that they were not impo…
100% match4 November 2011…ervation of Customes, brought a Habeas Corpus, upon which his tryall should then have beene, but the certain truth heerof your Honour may expect by the next. Westminster, May 24, 1655 — The trew cause of Serjeant Maynard, Serjeant Twisden, and Waddham [Windham’s] commitment to the Tower was for theire pleading to the Court, that the ordinance of his Highnesse and Councill for…
100% match4 November 2011…enteenth of May; and the next day Maynard and his fellow-pleaders were sent to the Tower, on the charge of having held language destructive to the existing government. The case did not end here. The day following, Cony, unsupported by counsel, presented himself at the bar of the upper bench, and did such justice to the situation in which he was placed, that Rolle, who presided in the court, felt utterly at…
100% match4 November 2011…e learned and profound lawyers” accordingly went to the Tower, whence, on the 25th May following, they humbly petitioned for their release, and Serjeant Maynard was discharged. On the 1st June Serjeant Twisden petitioned again for his release. He pleaded the case of his wife and seven children, regretted that what he had said in his client’s cause should have excited Hi…
100% match4 November 2011…chard Ⅱ., forbidden the importation of foreign wine in foreign bottoms, to have been in the habit of importing his Malaga wine in any ship, British or foreign, that happened to suit him; and, in March, 1655, war with Spain having in the meantime been declared, he was expecting the immediate arrival in the Downs of a Dutch ship with a consignment of Spanish wine. “I and my friends,” said he, in a petition to th…
100% match4 November 2011…as their member. Some contemporary newspaper articles by Gilbert Mabbot read: Westminster, May 19, 1655 — …Serjant Mainard, Serjant Twisden, and Waddam Windham, were yesterday taken from the bar in Westminster Hall, and sent prisoners to the Tower; the cause is not knowne, but vulgarly given out fo…
100% match4 November 2011…May 24, 1655 — The Court of Upper Bench granted an al[ia]s Habeas Corpus to Mr. Coney (error being found in the former), which was fil’d on Saturday last and judgment should have been Monday last given thereuppon, but deferred till the first day of the next terme. The 3 lawyers comitted to the Tower have petitioned for liberty, acknowledging and being sorrowfull for theire erroure, but yet his Hi…
100% match4 November 2011…4 November 2011 On this date in 1654, an English merchant named George Cony refused to pay customs duties that had been established by Oliver Cromwell’s government without its having bothered to go through parliament, and thereby called into question the legal underpinnings of the whole regime. Emily Cooper’s…
100% match4 November 2011…, and the petition was accordingly sent on to that body, with a note of a somewhat similar application to Parliament in January, 1652-3, which had been at that time favourably received. The Council sent this forthwith to their Committee, who, on the 16th November, reported “to signify to George Cony — on his petition to import Spanish wine in a Dutch vessel — that the Council thinks not fit to do anything in the matter at present,…
100% match4 November 2011…they would have Magna Carta (which they had talked so much on in Westminster Hall), they must put on each a helmet and troope for it! And now they see what they fought for. Here is the liberty of ye subject. On the same day, Joseph Jane wrote of his worry that the civil disobedience was fizzling out, with the lawyers petitioning meekly to Cromwell to be let out of the Tower: I doubt of…
100% match4 November 2011…pleading to the Court, that the ordinance of his Highnesse and Councill for receiveing the customes was noe better than a private order of a Councill table. Westminster, May 24, 1655 — The Court of Upper Bench granted an al[ia]s Habeas Corpus to Mr. Coney (error being found in the former), which was fil’d on Saturday last and judgment should…
100% match4 November 2011…he imported, on the pretence that they were not imposed by a legal authority. For this offence he was brought before the commissioners of customs on the sixth, and condemned in a fine of five hundred pounds on the sixteenth. Refusing to pay the fine, he was committed to prison on the twelfth of December for contempt. A writ of habeas corpus was moved for in his favour in…
100% match4 November 2011…had scruples in regard to Cony; if so, he was not the only judge who showed his independence. An Act of the Long Parliament (Statute 1653, c. 38) had continued the customs and excise till 26th March, 1654. An ordinance of the Protector and his Council (Ord. 1653, c. 15, 20th March, 1…
100% match4 November 2011…and the question came on to be heard on the seventeenth of May. This was an affair of vital importance to the government of Cromwel. An ordinance had been passed by the lord protector and council on the twentieth of March 1654, for the continuation of the duty of customs for the four succeeding years; and it was under the authority of this ordinance that the duties of customs were at present collected. But the…
100% match4 November 2011…acknowledging and being sorrowfull for theire erroure, but yet his Highnesse hath done nothing therein. George Radcliffe wrote in a letter at the time (18 June 1655): In England there is great expectation what wilbe comme of Conyes busines; it is put off till the next terme, and mens eyes are attent upon it, as more concerned…
100% match4 November 2011…Westminster, May 24, 1655 — The Court of Upper Bench granted an al[ia]s Habeas Corpus to Mr. Coney (error being found in the former), which was fil’d on Saturday last and judgment should have been Monday last given thereuppon, but deferred till the first day of the next terme. The 3 lawyers comitted to the Tower have petitioned for…
100% match4 November 2011…March, 1653–4) continued them till 26th March, 1658. The Parliament, 1656, confirmed and again continued the customs and excise. He was heard of again in August, 1656, when “the rabble of the town of Canterbury” were trying to get him chosen as their member. Some contemporary newspaper articles by…
100% match4 November 2011…Emily Cooper’s The History of England (1877) summarizes the case this way: A merchant named Cony refused in November, 1654, to pay the Customs dues, on the pretext that they were illegally imposed by the Protector, because unsanctioned by Parliament. The Commissioners of Customs fined Cony £500 for his refusal. This also he…
100% match4 November 2011…Cony’s counsel appear to have done full justice the case of their client; and Maynard in particular urged such arguments, and inforced them with such vigour, as, if ceded to, would have shaken the government to its basis. The cause was argued on the seventeenth of May; and the next day Maynard and his fellow-pleaders were sent to the Tower, on the charge of having held language destructive to the existing government.…
100% match3 November 2013…ch must win for the life of France.” William Genieys, an author who has written on the history of French politics, then gave a run-down of some prior French tax rebellions — like The Fronde (1648), the Poujadism of the 1950s, and a variety of tax discontent movements in the 1930s. He conclude…
100% match3 March 2011…erpent is as necessary now as ever! That is why knowledge of the Constitution is invaluable in political work. The long struggle between Parliament and the Crown over the control of taxation was practically decided by the Civil War of 1642 to 1648. After the Restoration of the Stuarts James Ⅱ. attempted to revive illegal taxation; for this and other misdoings he lost the throne, and by the Revolut…
100% match2 January 2014…the cause of the new comers that he receded from his position. The most masterful of these first settlers was Asser Levy. He made the first fight for the rights of citizenship. In 1655 an ordinance was passed that no Jews be permitted to serve in the militia, but that in lieu of this they be taxed sixty-five stivers each month. Asser Levy refused to pay this tax and petitioned the council for permi…
100% match1 September 2009…way to get in the bygone Annuities of those two years, for the better payment of the Ministers’ stipends, whereanent these presents shall be their warrand.” The difficulties attending the collection having continued to increase, on the 11th April, 1655, the Town Council “appointed John Straiton collector of the Annuity,” and as a stimulus to him to exert himself in recovering the outstanding arrears, which amounted t…
100% match1 September 2009…the inhabitants of this burgh, and to put the same into execution, if need be, for payment of the Annuities to the effect, — the ministers shall be paid of their stipends, whereanent these presents shall be their warrand.” 16th March, 1653. — Appoints a committee “to meet with those who were elders [it will be remembered that at this period, the sessions were appointed by annual elections] of the Ki…
100% match1 September 2009…tatement hazarded on any subject. The resistance began with the imposition of the Tax, and continued under all the changes took which place in the form of Church Government. Resistance during the establishment of modified episcopacy, from 1634 to 1639, when it was abolished It appears by a Minute of the Town Council, of date 25th May, 1635, that Edward Littell was appoin…
100% match1 September 2009…of ilk hundredth [6 per cent.; this is considerably more than the per centage which the salary of the present collector amounts to, on the sum collected by him] that he sall collect of the succeeding years and terms during his service.” 26th October, 1655 — Forsameikle as all fair and calm means has been used hitherto for payment of the bygane and present Annuities due by the neighbours, and nothing has succe…
100% match1 September 2009…is act was ever carried into effect. In 1658, it was found so difficult to raise a sufficient sum for the stipends of the ministers, which were greatly in arrear, that several members of the Town Council, on the 24th February, agreed to advance money out of their own pockets, to pay the stipends then resting; taking their chance of afterwards receiving payment from the city. This act of Volunt…
100% match1 September 2009…ing extracts from the Records of the Town Council, furnish ample evidence that the resistance continued during the whole period of the existence of the Presbyterian Established Church. It appears from the following Minute of Council, of 1st December, 1652, that in consequence of the Annuity Tax being so difficult to collect, the Treasurer of the Kirk Sessions was directed to take out…
100% match1 September 2009…16th March, 1653. — Appoints a committee “to meet with those who were elders [it will be remembered that at this period, the sessions were appointed by annual elections] of the Kirk-sessions, anno 1649 and 1650, and to find out a way to get in the bygone Annuities of those two years, for the better payment of the Ministers’ stipends, whereanent these presents shall be their warrand.” T…
100% match1 September 2009…the form of Church Government. Resistance during the establishment of modified episcopacy, from 1634 to 1639, when it was abolished It appears by a Minute of the Town Council, of date 25th May, 1635, that Edward Littell was appointed Collector of the Annuity, with a salary of £27, 15s. 5d., being rather more than 4 per cent. on the sum authorised to be levied. Resistanc…
100% match1 September 2009…in quartering of soldiers upon them, aye and untill all bygane and present Anuities be payed, whereanent these presents shall be their warrand.” There is nothing on the record showing that this act was ever carried into effect. In 1658, it was found so difficult to raise a sufficient sum for the stipends of the ministers, which were greatly in arrear, that several members of the Town Council, on the 24…
87% match1 September 2009…stablished their right to the whole produce of the Tax. The first cases occurred in 1830 and 1836.” Resistance during the presbyterian establishment, from 1639 to 1661, when it was abolished When Presbytery flourished in all its glory, as the Established Church under the Protectorate of Cromwell, the resistance to the payment of the Annuity Tax on t…
76% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1838-1840)…them down, our sympathy with persons is swallowed up in a wider sympathy with the universe. A crash is apt to grate agreeably on our ears. John Milton (1608–1674) Thoreau used this sentence in The Service. In the Greek legends of Troy, the sun is carried across the sky in a chariot.…
71% match27 February 2007…lf was based on a lecture Thoreau gave in 1843. When reading this essay, I feel out-of-my-depth in a sea of casual references to sixteenth- and seventeenth-century personalities and events. Raleigh himself I’m pretty vague on — isn’t he the guy John Lennon…
58% match“Letter to the Liberals” by Leo Tolstoy…tic government in Russia when Nicholas Ⅰ ascended the throne in 1825. — Translator Stenka Razin was a Cossack who raised a formidable insurrection in the seventeenth century. He was eventually defeated and captured, and was executed in Moscow in 1671. — Translator Pugatchef headed the most formidable Russian insurrection…
58% matchWe Won’t Pay!…nslations of Henry David Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience and his interpretations of Tolstoy’s non-resistance theories. The suffragist Women’s Tax Resistance League carried into battle a banner bearing the portrait of 17th century tax resister John Hampden, and Tolstoy took inspiration from Americans like Thoreau and William Lloyd Garrison. Thoreau and Garrison in turn drew on tales of the American Revoluti…
58% match24 August 2013…st. It still gives me that slight kick in the stomach. I sent back another letter informing them again that as a member of the Religious Society of Friends my belief dictates that I cannot pay for killing.… Where is the passion of the 17th-century Friends to witness our Peace Testimony? Recently a member of Atlanta (Ga.)…
58% match14 December 2004…er 1907. The WFL urged “no vote — no tax” the following month. Drawing once again on historical precedent, the suffragettes argued that in the seventeenth century, the king illegally levied taxes, whereas voteless women were illegally taxed by Parliament, an even more serious offense, since it occurred at a time of representative government. Militants b…
58% match4 August 2013…rly meeting itself at risk. In a letter to the Board of Inland Revenue (9/28/82), the clerk of the Meeting for Sufferings of London Yearly Meeting noted, “The name Meeting for Sufferings derives from the 17th century when Friends met to give support to those of their members who suffered in diverse ways for conscience’s sake and that at various times the Society of Friends corporately has recognized a religious o…
50% match21 July 2011…vy, both by rude people and by colour of Law.” a Quaker convert, “ffrancis Howard, yt had before cast frds into prison for Tythes, and had said yet if he lost all his tythes he would never take yt rigid course to prosecute again” “Jn the years 1658 & 1659, Many ffrds were brought Prisoners to Colchestr Castle for nonpayment of tithes” Around Colchester, “there was great sufferings Jn ye County upon frds for non paymt of tithes & for s…
47% match21 July 2011…The First Publishers of Truth: Being early records (now first printed) of the introduction of Quakerism into the counties of England and Wales: Richd Robinson [1628–1693]… was truly Valiant in bearing his Testimony for ye Truth, both under ye Conventicle Act & against Tythes & Steeplehouse Assessmts, &c…
42% matchPennsylvania Constitutional Convention, 25 October 1837…and nothing more nor less than a tax. In adverting to these arguments, he (Mr. F.) had taken occasion, fairly taken occasion, to say that in the 15th and 16th centuries one of the main arguments brought against those who had been brought to the stake and suffered martyrdom by the fire and faggot, was t…
36% match16 May 2008…ue to the Great Baptizer, that can wash and must wash us if ever we are clean. “Why do I differ with Friends” (say some) to which I answer that I don’t see where I differ in the least point, if by “Friends” is meant such as were called “Quakers” fifty or sixty years ago. But woe is me! my mother, that hath born me a man of strife and contention. I do not affect quarrels; but for strife or lawful striving, and contending heartily for the principles of our…
35% match1 December 2009…9 Bibliography The following excerpt from John Thomas Ball’s The Reformed Church of Ireland (1537–1886) concerns resistance to mandatory tithes by Irish Catholics in the 1830s. The value of the tithes levied at this time in Ireland may be reckoned at about six hundr…
34% match23 October 2014…embled about the first period of Quaker war tax resistance — between the founding of the Society of Friends and the establishment of the Quaker colony in Pennsylvania. The beginnings (~1647–1681) George Fox, the founder of the Society of Friends, was not a war tax resister. We know this because he explicitly advised Quakers to pay a war tax and also because his daughter kept good records of t…
34% match22 October 2014…from other sources when I could find it. There seem to me to be some distinct “periods” of Quaker war tax resistance: The beginnings (~1647–1681) War tax resistance has been part of Quaker practice almost from the very beginning. George Fox paid his war taxes and counseled Quakers to do so, but Robert Barclay’s…
30% match3 March 2011…tax them therein. No Taxation without Representation was their cry, and they meant it in a national sense, not an individual one. A long series of Charters and Statutes extending from 1215 to 1689 shows the intensity of the struggle made by Parliament against arbitrary taxation by the Crown. Four national rebellions of the first magnitude have been waged to secure this right — against John, R…
29% match13 December 2012…r the Friends’ Intelligencer advised readers how to structure their estates and bequests so as to avoid the “United States ‘war tax’.” French farmers in the 17th and 18th centuries used (and shared among themselves) every legal trick they could discover (and several less legal ones besides) to reduce or…
28% match30 October 2005…or convert (at least cosmetically) in order to survive. The history of the Society of Friends (the Quakers) from its origins in seventeenth century England is an example of a people persecuted for conscience’s sake, yet who ultimately prevailed. From 1647, when George Fox began his public ministry, until the passage of the Toleration Act of 1689, the Quakers were subject to almost continuous persecution. It was not until the early…
22% match11 March 2007…ble to find, until organized war tax resistance groups started up in the middle of the last century. This with a few exceptions: the traditional peace churches (Quakers and such) which had traditions of war tax refusal going back to at least the 17th century, tax resistance in the women’s suffrage movement (mostly in Britain, but some spilled over to America as well), and tax resistance by British nonconformists around…
19% match24 April 2008…We Won’t Pay!: A Tax Resistance Reader is complete and I’ve finished patting myself on the back for a job well done, I’ve started to work on a spin-off project: a reader that concentrates on war tax resistance by American Quakers from the 17th through the 19th century. I planned to take the existing sections of this material from We Won’t Pay! and add a littl…
19% match7 July 2012…that the Quaker refused to voluntarily pay the fine. This takes us up through the end of the 17th century and pretty well covers the first generation of Quakers. Unfortunately, as I mentioned, Hirst seems more interested in the evolution of Quaker doctrine conce…
17% match18 May 2008…pay war taxes, and just how entangled they should get with the state. The book has a postcript that is also of interest: Postscript I thought to have added (as our custom has been in England this fifty and odd years) a catalog of all the sufferers for conscience sake in this province for not paying to uphold war. But at present, I’ll instance two or three monstrosities, and leave the rest until another t…
11% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1852)…) Samuel Ayer (1654–1708) Joseph Bartlett’s narrative of captivity can be found as an appendix to Sketch of the History of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury, from 1635–1845 (1845) by Joshua Coffin René Hertel de Chambly (1675–1708) A brother of…
10% match24 December 2013…1 to 11. And when we women, individually, tried to reason with our men we were told, almost in chorus: “‘Dear ladies, to give you the suffrage, we would have to change our Constitution. And ladies — ladies — that has been changed only since 1629! [sic]’” “Now,” ask the women of Bermuda, “what are you going to do with men who haven’t yet emerged from the sixteen hundreds? How are we going to prevail upon them?” St…
9% matchExcerpts from H.D. Thoreau’s journals (1852)…The History of Haverhill, Massachusetts The brackets are Thoreau’s. Joseph Bradley (1664?–1727) Samuel Ayer (1654–1708) Joseph Bartlett’s narrative of captivity can be found as an appendix to Sketch of the History of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury, from 163…
5% match17 August 2014…It appears that a considerable sum of money has been annually raised, by a tax called the Annuity Tax, since 1651, for the support of the Edinburgh Clergy. This tax, though said to have been illegal till 1809, when it received legislative sanction by means of a clause fraudulently introduced into a local act of Parliament, has generally been submitted to. But of late considerable opposition has been made to the…
4% match17 August 2014…From the 17 August 1833 edition (excerpt): It appears that a considerable sum of money has been annually raised, by a tax called the Annuity Tax, since 1651, for the support of the Edinburgh Clergy. This tax, though said to have been illegal till 1809, when it received legislative sanction by means of a clause fraudulently int…
1% match9 July 2013…ee” featuring the speakers “Jesse Yaukey, Lawrence Scott, and Oliver Stone.” Remembering Quaker history In the 1 March issue, LaVerne Hill Forbush looked back at “Suffering of Friends in Maryland, 1658–1810” and noted that between 1744 and 1810 there were 296 cases of Friends suffering fines in one region, 34 “for refusal to pay priest’s wages, [but] the greater number of fines h…